FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. I want to bring my dog/cat with me to Japan. What paperwork and/or shots are required?
  2. What are my duty-free allowances when travelling to Japan?
  3. How much currency may I bring into Japan?
  4. Will I be able to bring my prescription and non-prescription medications with me to Japan?
  5. Are there any non-prescription drugs that I can buy over the counter in the United States but are barred from importation to Japan?
  6. What types of fruits, nuts and meats may I bring into Japan?
  7. Other Questions on Visiting Japan NEW!

 

1. I want to bring my dog/cat with me to Japan. What paperwork and/or shots are required?

*Note: As of November 6th, 2004, new regulations for bringing dogs, cats, and other animals into Japan were implemented. Please consult the Consulate-General of Japan or the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture's Animal Quarantine Service's website at http://www.maff.go.jp/aqs/english/index.html for details and directions about how to import your dog(s), cat(s), and/or other pets into Japan.

 

2. What are my duty-free allowances when traveling to Japan?

  1. Alcoholic Beverages: 3 bottles per adult (20 years of age). A bottle contains approx. 760 c.c. If the 3 bottle duty free allowance is surpassed, the following duties will be charged per each additional bottle:

    Whiskey: 975 yen/bottle (750cc)
    Brandy: 910 yen/bottle (700cc)
    Gin, vodka, rum, & other spirits: 300 yen/bottle (750 cc)
    Wine & others:150 yen/bottle (750 cc)

  2. Tobacco Products:
    a) For non-residents of Japan, there is a duty-free allowance of 500 grams total of tobacco products consisting of either 400 foreign cigarettes, 100 cigars, or 500 grams of other forms of tobacco, or any combination of the above, provided that the total quantity does not surpass the 500 gram limit. In addition, 200 Japanese cigarettes will be allowed in duty-free.
    b) For residents of Japan, there is a duty-free allowance of 250 grams total of tobacco products consisting of either 200 foreign cigarettes, 50 cigars, or 250 grams of other forms of tobacco, or any combination of the above, provided that the total quantity does not surpass the 250 gram limit. In addition, 200 Japanese cigarettes will be allowed in duty-free.
    Persons under 20 years of age must pay duties on all tobacco products brought into Japan.

  3. Perfume: 2oz.

  4. Other Items: The total overseas market value of all the articles other than the above items must be under 200,000 yen to avoid duty.
    Any item whose total overseas market value does not exceed 10,000 yen is always free of duties and/or taxes and is not counted in the calculation of the total overseas market value of 200,000 yen. (e.g., Two ties worth 5,000 yen each)

  5. Please note: Clothing, toiletries, and other personal effects for your own use, as well as portable professional equipment that will be used during your stay in Japan, are free of duties and/or taxes, if they are considered appropriate and are not for sale.

3. How much currency may I bring into Japan?

There is no limit to the total amount of means of payment that may be brought into or taken out of Japan. However, if you transport means of payment exceeding JP 1,000,000 yen or its equivalent or precious metal (more than 90% purity’s gold only) exceeding 1kg of total weight, you are required to report this to Japanese Customs.

For more information, please contact the Japanese Customs Service:

Tokyo Customs HQ
5-30 Konan 5-chome
Minato-ku, Tokyo 108
Phone: 03-3742-7001 (From the U.S., please dial as 011-81-3-3742-7001)

4. Will I be able to bring my prescription and non-prescription medications with me to Japan?

You can bring up to one month’s supply of prescription drugs into Japan, and up to two month’s supply of non-prescription drugs without filing any paperwork. This same rule applies to mailing prescription and/or non-prescription drugs.

It is always a good idea to have a copy of the prescription and/or letter from the prescribing physician explaining the nature of the medication, the purpose of taking it, recommended dosage, and frequency of ingestion.

Most prescription drugs are permitted, including drugs that may not be available in Japan, such as birth control pills. Drugs that are hallucinogenic, narcotic, and/or psychotropic in nature will be confiscated, except in extenuating circumstances where prior approval has been obtained (e.g., a cancer patient taking a type of medication that has a high percentage of pain killer. These cases are treated on a case- by-case basis.)

5. Are there any non-prescription drugs that I can buy over the counter in the United States but are barred from importation to Japan?

The following over-the-counter medications are prohibited in Japan since they contain narcotic or stimulant ingredients in excess of the Japanese standard:


6. What types of fruits, nuts, and meats may I bring into Japan?

  1. Fresh Products: You should avoid bringing fresh fruit, vegetable or meat* products to Japan. In general, if you intend to bring these items into Japan, you will need to get the appropriate phytosanitary documentation from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). The contact number for the USDA at the SeaTac Airport is (206) 244-4244.
    Please note that the following fresh fruits are prohibited from importation into Japan: apple, pear, quince, nectarine, peach, plum, apricot, cherry.

  2. Canned Products: fruit, or vegetable products are allowed.

  3. Dried Produce: Dried fruit or vegetable products are allowed, as long as they are commercially dried (not home dried) and remain in their original, unopened packaging.

  4. Other Processed Foods: Items such as cookies, crackers, candies, cereals, dried noodles, etc., may be brought into Japan. Most types of nuts (with the exception of walnuts, which are prohibited) may be brought into Japan, particularly if they are salted, dried, or roasted.
*Since December 24, 2003, due to concerns over Bovine Spongiform Encephalitis (BSE), the importation of all products derived from even-toed ungulates, which include cattle, sheep, and goats from the United States into Japan has been temporarily suspended. This ban includes commonly imported items such as beef jerky. Products derived from deer have also been banned because of a disease similar to BSE.

*Poultry products from certain U.S. States have been banned due to concerns over Avian Flu.

*Please consult the Consulate-General of Japan or Japanese Animal Quarantine Service's website athttp://www.maff.go.jp/aqs/english/index.html for the latest information about these bans, or other prohibited or restricted items.

7. Other Questions on Visiting Japan